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fyp-philosophy:

Existentialism is a term applied to the work of certain late 19th- and 20th-century philosophers who, despite profound doctrinal differences, shared the belief that philosophical thinking begins with the human subject—not merely the thinking subject, but the acting, feeling, living human individual. In existentialism, the individual’s starting point is characterized by what has been called “the existential attitude”, or a sense of disorientation and confusion in the face of an apparently meaningless or absurd world. Many existentialists have also regarded traditional systematic or academic philosophies, in both style and content, as too abstract and remote from concrete human experience.
Søren Kierkegaard is generally considered to have been the first existentialist philosopher, though he did not use the term existentialism. He proposed that each individual—not society or religion—is solely responsible for giving meaning to life and living it passionately and sincerely (“authentically”). Existentialism became popular in the years following World War II, and strongly influenced many disciplines besides philosophy, including theology, drama, art, literature, and psychology.
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Jul 23, 2014 / 1,036 notes

fyp-philosophy:

Existentialism is a term applied to the work of certain late 19th- and 20th-century philosophers who, despite profound doctrinal differences, shared the belief that philosophical thinking begins with the human subject—not merely the thinking subject, but the acting, feeling, living human individual. In existentialism, the individual’s starting point is characterized by what has been called “the existential attitude”, or a sense of disorientation and confusion in the face of an apparently meaningless or absurd world. Many existentialists have also regarded traditional systematic or academic philosophies, in both style and content, as too abstract and remote from concrete human experience.

Søren Kierkegaard is generally considered to have been the first existentialist philosopher, though he did not use the term existentialism. He proposed that each individual—not society or religion—is solely responsible for giving meaning to life and living it passionately and sincerely (“authentically”). Existentialism became popular in the years following World War II, and strongly influenced many disciplines besides philosophy, including theology, drama, art, literature, and psychology.

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(via dreamboatcourtney)

I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.
Umberto Eco, Foucault’s Pendulum (via fyp-philosophy)

(via dreamboatcourtney)

Jul 22, 2014 / 559 notes
Why should you worry about the future? You don’t even know the present properly. Take care of the present and the future will take care of itself.
Ramana Maharshi (via larmoyante)
Jul 22, 2014 / 1,515 notes
explore-blog:

Jeanette Winterson on reading, time, and how art creates a sanctified space for the human experience – spectacular 1994 interview. 
Jul 21, 2014 / 317 notes

explore-blog:

Jeanette Winterson on reading, time, and how art creates a sanctified space for the human experience – spectacular 1994 interview. 

Jul 21, 2014 / 1,216 notes
fleurdulys:

Rovina sul mare - Arnold Bocklin
1880
Jul 21, 2014 / 159 notes

fleurdulys:

Rovina sul mare - Arnold Bocklin

1880

(via calantheandthenightingale)

Art is something that happens inside us. We look at things in the world, and we become excited by them. We understand our own possibilities of becoming. And that’s what art is.
Jul 21, 2014 / 1,167 notes
fuckyeahsarahbernhardt:

Sara Bernhardt played Mélissinde in Edmon Rostand’s play La Princesse lointaine at the Théâtre de la Renaissance. Mucha created the poster for a special banquet in 1896. It was reproduced in La Plume magazine, the Edition d’Art, and as a postcard for the department store La Belle Jardinière.
Jul 21, 2014 / 63 notes

fuckyeahsarahbernhardt:

Sara Bernhardt played Mélissinde in Edmon Rostand’s play La Princesse lointaine at the Théâtre de la Renaissance. Mucha created the poster for a special banquet in 1896. It was reproduced in La Plume magazine, the Edition d’Art, and as a postcard for the department store La Belle Jardinière.

(via nouveaufindesiecle)

I don’t listen to what art critics say. I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is.
Jean-Michel Basquiat (via artnotart14)

(via thevelvetsubmarine)

Jul 21, 2014 / 37 notes
Jul 20, 2014 / 240 notes
scarlettandthelove:

"Gypsy Dancer," Loomis Dean, 1960
Jul 20, 2014 / 895 notes

scarlettandthelove:

"Gypsy Dancer," Loomis Dean, 1960

(via wordissound)

My mouth can’t translate the things my heart says.
Jin Akanishi (via bribery)

(via somberlily)

Jul 20, 2014 / 73,153 notes
We die to each other daily.
What we know of other people
Is only our memory of the moments
During which we knew them. And they have changed since then.
To pretend that they and we are the same
Is a useful and convenient social convention
Which must sometimes broken. We must also remember
That at every meeting we are meeting a stranger.
T.S. Eliot, The Cocktail Party (via bookmania)
Jul 20, 2014 / 1,293 notes
Jul 20, 2014 / 40,813 notes

unexplained-events:

Anthropomorphic Tree

Anthropomorphism which is the recognition of human-like characteristics or form in animals, plants or non-living things. This tree, which can be found in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, has roots which have taken a human-like form.

(via hauntedgardenbook)

Once in a while it really hits people that they don’t have to experience the world in the way they have been told to.
Alan Keightley (via larmoyante)
Jul 20, 2014 / 9,071 notes